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Visual Anthropology Review Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Society for Visual Anthropology

Kate Hennessy

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July 27, 2016

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Jennifer Hubbert on the Iconicity and reappropriation of Tank Man

July 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jennifer Hubbert from Visual Anthropology Review on Vimeo.

Jennifer Hubbert’s video interview about her article “Appropriating Iconicity: Why Tank Man Still Matters” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014), which explores the reappropriation of iconic photographs, examining what happens when the iconic “Tank Man” image is modified and repurposed to new political ends.

Kate Hennessy

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April 17, 2016

Visual Anthropology Review seeks Book Review Editors

April 17, 2016 | By | No Comments

Visual Anthropology Review, the premier journal in visual anthropology, is looking for two individuals to head the US and European book review sections of VAR. The book review editors solicit and select suitable books, recruit reviewers, edit the reviews, preparing 2-3 reviews for each issue of VAR, and submit them to the journal co-editors for publication. While working with the journal’s editorial team, the book review editors have a great deal of freedom to shape the reviews section as they see fit. This is an ideal position for someone who wants to become more involved in academic publishing, make contacts across the visual anthropology community, and keep abreast of cutting edge scholarship in visual anthropology. We seek one editor based in the US and one based elsewhere to deal with presses in their regions.

Interested parties should send a cv and a brief description (300 words) of the experience and innovations they would hope to bring to the VAR book reviews section by May 1st to the present editors: Ruth E. Toulson (rtoulson@mica.edu) and Kathryn Lichti-Harriman (whirldpixc@gmail.com)

Kate Hennessy

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December 16, 2015

Visual Anthropology Review: Call for Co-Editor

December 16, 2015 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology invites applications for the co-editorship of its journal, Visual Anthropology Review (VAR). One of the current co-editors will finish his service to VAR in May 2016, and SVA seeks an individual to transition into the position of a new co-editor during the Spring 2016 semester. The typical period for a co-editorship is three years.

If you are interested in applying for the position, please email a letter of intent and a CV to the current co-editors: Jenny Chio (jenny.chio@emory.edu) and Mark Westmoreland (m.r.westmoreland@fsw.leidenuniv.nl). Please also direct any questions about the position to Jenny Chio and Mark Westmoreland. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, beginning January 4, 2016.

About the Position
VAR is a biannual academic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes 12-15 articles per year. The co-editors are assisted by the journal’s film review editor and two book review editors, who manage the publication of 15-20 book and film reviews per year.

Qualifications of the Co-Editor:

·      A PhD in Anthropology and a background of teaching, research and publishing in fields related to visual anthropology.

·       Proven organizational and editorial skills.

·       Interest in online multi-media publishing.

Responsibilities of the Co-Editor:

·       Edit the journal under the protocols established by Wiley-Blackwell and the American Anthropological Association.

·       Work with Wiley-Blackwell to maintain the established workflow, to meet the  deadlines and requirements for two issues per year.

·       Solicit articles and suggest ideas for special issues or articles.

·       Receive articles and manage them through the review process. This involves maintaining records on each submitted article; engaging two reviewers for a “double-blind” peer review for each article; reading the submitted articles and the peer reviews and contacting the authors as to the final decision.

·       Work with website managers from SVA and Wiley-Blackwell to contribute, update, and maintain content online, including video and other multi-media content.

·       Supervise and recruit, as needed, the VAR editorial assistant.

·      Attend publishing, editorial, and SVA Board meetings during the annual AA conference over the duration of the co-editorship.

About the Journal
Visual Anthropology Review is published by the American Anthropological Association and promotes the discussion of visual studies, broadly conceived.

From independent cinema to indigenous media, ethnographic portraiture to Hollywood headshots, street style to narcocultura, VAR has already become the go-to journal for cutting-edge anthropological work on visual media, and we are very optimistic about the future of the journal as we expand into new modes and domains. VAR is currently in the process of re-imagining and re-creating its publishing model to better reflect and support the visual, multi-media, and experimental work being produced by visual anthropologists today. VAR aims to be a leader in scholarly promotion and critique of experimental ethnographic work by developing multi-media platform for more dynamic content.

We welcome articles, photo-essays, reviews, and commentary on the use of multimedia, still photography, film, video, and non-camera-generated images. We have also begun a new series of online “Supplements” for individual articles and issues, providing teaching-related content and additional online materials related to recently published pieces.

The journal has produced special issues on topics such as “Ethnographic Filmmaking in China,” “Engaging Visual Anthropology in the Entangled Lives of Species,” “Visual Representations of Aboriginal Australia,” “HIV/AIDS Education and Southern Africa,” and “Visual Latin America.”

VAR has an international readership and publishes work by scholars and artists throughout the world. The journal’s reputation is bolstered by its Editorial Board that includes more than twenty internationally distinguished academics and practitioners, including Peter Biella, Amahl Bishara, John Bishop, Tom Blakely, Liam Buckley, Jennifer Deger, Elizabeth Edwards, Tejaswini Ganti, Faye Ginsburg, Anna Grimshaw, Tim Ingold, John L. Jackson Jr., Dorinne Kondo, Laura Lewis, Brent Luvaas, David MacDougall, Jonathan Marion, Leighton Peterson, Christopher Pinney, Arnd Schneider, Karen Strassler, and Christopher Wright.

If you have an interest in pushing cutting-edge visual scholarship, exploring online and open-access publishing models, and adding your critical expertise to the development of VAR over the next few years, then please consider submitting your application.

Mark Westmoreland & Jenny Chio
Co-Editors, Visual Anthropology Review
Society for Visual Anthropology
American Anthropological Association

Contact Details:
Jenny Chio
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Emory University
Atlanta GA 30322
jenny.chio@emory.edu

Mark R. Westmoreland
Associate Professor of Visual Anthropology
Leiden University
2300 RB Leiden
The Netherlands
m.r.westmoreland@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

Kate Hennessy

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October 26, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Jonathan Westin on Uncertainty in Historical Visualizations

October 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

Jonathan Westin’s “Inking a Past: Visualization as a Shedding of Uncertainty” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014) uses Actor-Network Theory to understand how a visualization studio renders representations of the past.
Questions for classroom discussion:

1. When thinking of the past, for instance Medieval Times or Antiquity, what images form in your mind and how do you differ between the different time periods? Are there certain elements you “include” in your mental image that gives you cues?

2. How does the visualization work of SIF (Studio InkLink Firenze) compare to previous efforts to visualize ancient Rome and other past societies? What are the dominant trends in archeological visualization today?

3. The article describes how an illustration is created through a series of steps that bring shape and form to an initial idea. Is any one step more important than another, and who is the most influential actant in this chain of procedures?

4. The article concludes that it is better to speculate than to only reconstruct what is certain. What dangers lies in both of these approaches respectively, and what are the advantages?

5. How do you think the insights and concepts of Actor-Network Theory can benefit visual anthropologists in their work?

6. One of the most controversial elements of an ANT perspective is the endowing of objects and other nun-human elements with agency, that is, interpreting them as actants within a larger actor-network. What does such a move do to anthropological theory? How does it complicate or clarify the interpretative work of anthropologists?

7. Is it time for an ANT analysis of the field of anthropology itself? Have we escaped the interrogative lens of STS work for too long?

Links:

 

Kate Hennessy

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October 15, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Noelle Stout on Promiscuous Circulation

October 15, 2015 | By | No Comments

Noelle Stout’s video interview about her article, “Bootlegged: Unauthorized Circulation and the Dilemmas of Collaboration in the Digital Age” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014), shows how digital technology both expands the possibilities for collaborative ethnographic filmmaking and challenges these relationships, since videos can be easily copied and circulated beyond the established consent agreements.

 

Kate Hennessy

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September 11, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Deborah Matzner on South Asian Soundscapes

September 11, 2015 | By | No Comments

Deborah Matzner’s article on “Jai Bhim Comrade and the Politics of Sound in Urban Indian Visual Culture” in Visual Anthropology Review examines the sonic practices of the Dalit movement in Maharashtra as depicted by Indian documentary filmmaker Anand Patwardhan.

Figure 5 Megaphone on Taxi

Kate Hennessy

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August 31, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: William Lempert on Native Science Fiction Film

August 31, 2015 | By | No Comments

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

The following set of activities is meant to be a teacher-led pedagogical tool for provoking undergraduates to engage their perceptions of indigenous futures. It is hoped that this will help to disrupt the ways in which Native peoples have become representationally embedded within Western media and imaginations as artifacts of the past.

  1. Close your eyes for 60 seconds and in as vivid detail as possible, imagine that extraterrestrials land on Earth today. Write down a few key images.
    • Where do they land and who do they meet?
    • Is there conflict? If so, describe it.
  1. This time, close your eyes for 60 seconds and vividly imagine what the future, broadly defined, will look like in 200 years. Write down a few key images.
    • What utopian and dystopian elements did this include?
    • What role, if any, was there for indigenous people?
  1. List a few of your favorite science fiction films.
    • In what ways do the plots of these films correlate with what you imagined in the first two activities?
    • How influential do you think these films have been on your own ideas about the future?
  1. Watch as many of the clips below as you have time for (totals approximately 35 minutes).
    • What was your reaction to these clips in light of this article?
    • Did you agree with the author’s interpretations? Why or why not?
  1. In light of the article and these viewings, choose one of your listed favorite sci-fi films from activity 3 and briefly describe how it might be reimagined to highlight indigenous perspectives.
  1. To what extent does the article convince you that the representations of indigenous peoples in science fiction films have the potential to make practical differences in the lives of indigenous peoples?

Film Links

Available Film Links

 Lisa Jackson’s The Visit (4 mins)

Vistas – The Visit by Lisa Jackson, National Film Board of Canada

Jeff Barnaby’s File under Miscellaneous (7 mins)

Nanobah Becker’s The 6th World (15 mins)

FOR MORE NATIVE SCI-FI FILM CLIPS, CLICK HERE TO LEMPERT’S ONLINE ARCHIVE OF 18 STREAMING CLIPS

CLICK HERE TO LINK TO A GENERAL AUDIENCE BLOG POST THAT SUMMARIZES THE VAR ARTICLE

Related Readings

Dillon, Grace. 2012. Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Nama, Adilifu. 2008. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Rieder, John. 2008. Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press.

Collins, Samuel. 2008. All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements with the Future. New York: Berghahn Books.

Supplemental Resources

 Imagining Indigenous Futurisms – Facebook Page

This facebook page is an excellent resource to critical scholarship and commentary on indigenous futurisms, with regular engagement with Native science fiction films.

IndigiTube

IndigiTube is an Aboriginal Australian example of an video-sharing website that aligns with indigenous futurism in that it is a new media delivery system that appeals to indigenous youth whose primary media engagements are through phones and tablets, as well as its wide variety of topics that transcend binary tropes around tradition and “contemporary modern” life.

Bunky Echo-Hawk’s Website

 

Kate Hennessy

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June 15, 2015

Visual Anthropology Review 31(1) Spring 2015: “Leviathan and the Entangled Lives of Species”

June 15, 2015 | By | No Comments

“Leviathan and the Entangled Lives of Species,” a special issue of Visual Anthropology Review, is out now. Read critiques and commentary by prominent anthropologists and visual scholars—including Christopher Pinney, Catherine Russell, and Eduardo Kohn—about Leviathan, the exciting and challenging piece of ethnographic cinema that is pushing visual representation into new terrain. Also, check out photo essays and experimental audio-visual materials by anthropologists like Amanda Concha-Holmes and Rodrigo F. Rentería-Valencia, that explore the utility of visual ethnography for investigating the entanglement of human lives with birds, fish, monkeys, and other species. This special issue interrogates the role of visual anthropology in re-thinking our understandings of human/non-human relations. It is available on AnthroSource and through Wiley-Blackwell.

 

Aynur Kadir

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April 20, 2015

Call for Co-Editor of “Visual Anthropology Review”

April 20, 2015 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology invites applications for the co-editorship of its journal, “Visual Anthropology Review” (VAR). One of the current co-editors will finish his service to VAR in December of 2015 and SVA seeks an individual to transition into the position of a new co-editor during the Fall 2015 semester.  The typical period for a co-editorship is three years.
If you are interested in applying for the position, please email a letter of intent and a CV to current co-editors Brent Luvaas (luvaas@drexel.edu<mailto:Luvaas@drexel.edu>) and Mark Westmoreland (mark.westmoreland@ims.su.se <mailto:mark.westmoreland@ims.su.se>). Please also direct any questions about the position to Brent Luvaas and Mark Westmoreland.  Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, beginning May 1, 2015.

Details about the Position and the Journal

Qualifications of the Co-Editor:

1. A PhD in Anthropology and a background of teaching, research and publishing in fields related to visual anthropology.

2. Proven organizational and editorial skills.

VAR is a biannual academic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes 12-15 articles per year.  The co-editors are assisted by the journal’s film review editor and book review editor, who manage the publication of 15-20 book and film reviews per year.

The Responsibilities of the Co-Editor:

1. Edit the journal under the protocols established by Wiley-Blackwell and the American Anthropological Association.

2. Work with Wiley-Blackwell to maintain the established workflow, to meet the deadlines and copy requirements for two issues per year.

3. Solicit articles and suggest ideas for special issues or articles.

4. Receive articles and manage them through the review process. This involves maintaining records on each submitted article; engaging two reviewers for a “double-blind” peer review for each article; reading the submitted articles and the peer reviews and contacting the authors as to the final decision.

VAR is published by the American Anthropological Association and promotes the discussion of visual studies, broadly conceived. Visual studies include visual aspects of human behavior and the use of visual media in anthropological research, representation, and teaching. We welcome articles, photo-essays, reviews, and commentary on the use of multimedia, still photography, film, video, and non-camera-generated images, as well as on visual ideologies, indigenous media, applied visual anthropology, art, dance, gesture, sign language, human movement, museology, architecture, and material culture.

The journal has produced special issues on topics such as “Ethnographic Filmmaking in China,” “Engaging Visual Anthropology in the Entangled Lives of Species,” “Visual Representations of Aboriginal Australia,” “HIV/AIDS Education and Southern Africa,” and “Visual Latin America.” VAR has an international readership. It publishes work by scholars and artists, academics, and practitioners throughout the world. VAR welcomes work from all subfields of anthropology, as well as multidisciplinary work in the fine arts, and in the sciences and liberal arts.

Brent Luvaas
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Co-Editor of Visual Anthropology Review
Department of Anthropology
Drexel University
Philadelphia, PA 19104
(215) 571-3660

metafactory

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December 29, 2011

Visual Anthropology Review, Vol.27 No.2

December 29, 2011 | By |

Visual Anthropology Review Cover, Vol.27.2

Visual Anthropology Review Cover, Vol.27.2


Table of Contents


ARTICLES

Tattoo Removal: Three Snapshots
by Susan A. Phillips

Round Trip: Filming a Return Home
by Angela Torresan

Ravens and Film: Stories of Continuity and Mediation
by Eugenia Kisin

A Child’s Right to Participation: Photovoice as Methodology for Documenting the Experiences of Children Living in Kenyan Orphanages
by Ginger A. Johnson

“I’ll Show You My Wounds”: Engaging Suffering through Film
by Alberto Guevara and Elysée Nouvet

 

FILM REVIEWS

Many Mexicos, Vistas de la frontera. Arizona State Museum. November 19, 2010–November 17, 2012.
Michael M. Brescia (lead curator).
reviewed by: Lucero Radonic

Eating Alaska. Directed by Ellen Frankenstein, 2008, 57 minutes, color. Distributed by New Day Films, P.O. Box 1084, Harriman, NY 10926, http://www.newday.com
reviewed by: Madeline Chera

Umiaq Skin Boat. Directed by Jobie Weetaluktuk, 2008, 31 minutes, B&W and color. Distributed by Documentary Educational Resources, 101 Morse Street, Watertown, MA 02472, http://www.der.org
reviewed by: Nelson Graburn

 

BOOK REVIEWS

Hong Kong: Migrant Lives, Landscapes, and Journeys. Caroline Knowles and Douglas Harper. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2009.
reviewed by: Sharon R. Roseman

 

Global Indigenous Media: Culture, Poetics, and Politics. Edited by Pamela Wilson and Michelle Stewart. ••: Duke University Press, 2008.
reviewed by: Pavel Shlossberg

Making the Scene: A History of Stage Design and Technology in Europe and the United States. Oscar G. Brockett, Margaret Mitchell, and Linda Hardberger. San Antonio: Tobin Theatre Arts Fund, U of Texas P, 2010.
reviewed by: Irene Middleton

Viewpoints: Visual Anthropologist at Work. Edited by Mary Strong and Laena Wilder. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2009.
reviewed by: Jason E. Miller



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