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Call for Submissions Archives - Page 2 of 15 - Society for Visual Anthropology

Kate Hennessy

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July 19, 2016

Ethnographic Terminalia 2016, Minneapolis: Workshop ––”The Photo-Essay is Dead! Long live the Photo-Essay!”

July 19, 2016 | By | No Comments

Meetings of the American Anthropology Association, 2016
Minneapolis MN
Thursday, November 17, 2016 9:00-4:00

See our Call for Photo-Essayist Presentations here (deadline August 15th)
General participant registration on the AAA Website will be available soon.
Please send inquiries to ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Overview
The Ethnographic Terminalia Collective invites submissions by photo-essayists working within an anthropological idiom to present their photo-essays at a full-day workshop at the 2016 AAA Meetings in Minneapolis: “The Photo-Essay is Dead! Long Live the Photo-Essay!” The full-day workshop is designed for creative and engaged participation from both participants and presenters.  It is structured around three sessions each of which features the presentation of a photo-essay, a thought-provoking discussion of photography in Anthropology, and facilitator-led group activity. In the course of the day up to thirty workshop participants and six presenters will collectively contribute to a zine (an open-access and limited print-edition workshop publication) that will be launched and distributed at a reception on Saturday, Nov. 19th. The zine will function not only as a document of the workshop but also a formal object around which we explore the past, present, and future of the photo-essay in Anthropology.

Building on our art-anthropology experiments in off-site locations, this year we return  to the AAA conference site to re-examine the photo-essay within anthropological, photographic, and publishing communities.  Emulating our recent workshop and rapid-publication project (see http://ethnographicterminalia.org/terminus), the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective invites you to join us in actively considering how experimentations at the intersection of art and anthropology might function as prototypes for thinking about the future of the photographic image in anthropology.  We are all literally publishing at the terminus — the end of publishing agreements, the end of print, the end of things as they have been. How might the photo-essay work as a prototype for collectively envisioning a future of visual anthropology?

Rationale
Photographs have been a component of anthropological practice since its earliest formation. Their popularity over the past 150 years in monographs, journals, exhibitions, and now on the Internet, has increased dramatically. While photographs seem to be everywhere there has been little serious and sustained critical engagement with modes of presentation and publication in the context of visual anthropology.  For over a decade, the internet has increasingly become a rapid and inexpensive way to share photographs but there is little discussion about the forms in which they appear and how people engage with them. Due partly to cost, the photo-essay has never become prevalent within academic publications. Furthermore there is little clarity around the definition of a photo-essay especially in the context of anthropology. This is precisely what interests us. Our academic conventions for sharing photographs have been cemented around a limited number of typically black and white images in a journal article or monograph. It is only within the last decade that we’ve begun to see anthropological photo-essays published on-line and these often seem to be either ghettoized within the structure of the journal’s website or overlooked by readers unfamiliar with the genre.  Meanwhile within journalism and documentary photography there has been a surge of experiments and formal endeavours.

We believe that still photographs are on the cusp of finding new importance in anthropology in the form of the photo-essay, in particular as the serial nature of photography is being tested out within digital infrastructures on the Internet. For example, the journal Cultural Anthropology recently launched a photo-essay section of their journal; other major journals, now investing in digital infrastructures, are leveraging the Internet to share photographs. How digital forms and cross-disciplinary engagements with photographic representations are re-shaping aesthetic and ethical commitments to the photo essay remains unclear. However, we do know that more and more anthropologists use cameras in the field and many students are keen to study visual methodologies. As a result, the criteria for evaluating their critical and aesthetic contributions have yet to be fully developed. Further, the creative potential for the photo-essay to be realized in new formats and contexts is as yet generally unexplored. Ethnographic Terminalia has had a sustained engagement with contemporary art since 2009; in the workshop, we will  bring artists and anthropologists together to appreciate the degree of sophistication and variety of experiments in what might be loosely considered the photo-essay.

Workshop Structure
Ethnographic Terminalia is committed to serious play; our workshops are carefully designed to foster lively and generative spaces for critical collective exploration of a topic, thesis, or question.  Facilitated by the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, up to thirty participants and six presenters will work collectively throughout the day to generate the materials for a zine in the form of a rapid prototype publication.  This workshop is organized into three sessions, each with: 1) an essayist exploring their work in the form of a single photo-essay; 2) a provocateur who will critically explore some element of the photo-essay; and 3) facilitated activities and open time for participant reflection on and annotation of works in progress, discussion, and contribution to the workshop publication.

Before the workshop, photo-essayists  and provocateurs will be asked to submit creatively designed page spreads featuring photo-essays and discussions. These will be included in the zine and printed for annotation during the workshop. Participants are also encouraged to print photographs from their own photo-essay works-in-progress and bring them to work with throughout the day.

During the workshop, presenters’ photo-essays will be installed for viewing and annotation. Participants and provocateurs will be invited to add commentary and other ephemera (using photography, photo printers, drawing, social media posts, annotation, and so on) to further contribute to the conversation. These contributions will be documented for inclusion in the publication. Additionally, workshop participants (who are not official presenters) are invited to bring their own photo essays-in-progress to contribute to the workshop activity, and which may be included in the publication.

After the workshop the Ethnographic Terminalia collective will complete the design and layout of the zine.  We will print copies for distribution on Saturday afternoon (Nov. 19th) at the AAA Meetings at a special event and zine launch supported by the Society for Visual Anthropology.  All participants will receive a copy of the zine, as will a limited number of reception attendees. An open access digital copy of the zine will be archived on the Ethnographic Terminalia website. You can see an example of the publication “Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art” that we produced at our last workshop in Vancouver, British Columbia in 2015. http://ethnographicterminalia.org/terminus.

Kate Hennessy

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July 5, 2016

CFP: Documenting the Visual Arts (edited collection; deadline: Nov 1, 2016)

July 5, 2016 | By | No Comments

The proliferation and popularity of visual arts documentaries are a major component of the recent international documentary boom, but they tend to be overlooked in film criticism and scholarship in favor of documentaries framed more explicitly in social and political terms. Yet visual arts documentaries remain on the cutting edge of documentary innovation, from 3D cinema (Cave of Forgotten Dreams) to questioning documentary truths (Exit Through the Gift Shop). Moreover, visual arts documentaries have long played significant roles in various historical formations around documentary politics (e.g. USIA films in the Cold War, the Left Bank essay films of 1950s and Channel Four programming in the 1980s).

This edited collection will examine the significance of visual arts documentaries from a range of critical perspectives and methodologies. The book will explore not only how documentaries from around the globe exploit the formal properties of film and video to illuminate the aesthetic specificities and intersections of other visual arts, but also how they elucidate the material and cultural conditions in which visual arts are produced and experienced (e.g. the discourse of the artist, museums and galleries, activist art, religious practice, commercial design etc.). To complement these interpretative contributions, the book will also include critical analyses of the political economy of visual arts documentaries, especially the geopolitics of the genre. As an interdisciplinary and intermedial project, I am particularly interested in contributions that connect film studies to other disciplines and fields, including anthropology, art history, architecture, communication, rhetoric, performance studies and visual studies, among others. Consideration will be given to submissions about any historical period or cultural/national/regional context (the book aims for genuinely global scope). Contributions may focus on a single film, a body of work (organized around filmmaker, artist or subject) or a particular institutional context. I am defining visual arts broadly to include applied arts, such as fashion, architecture and design, as well as film, video, photography, painting, sculpture, illustration and performance art etc.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
• Medium specificity and the visual arts documentary
• Cultural politics of visual arts television programming
• Documentary film and arts education
• Visual arts documentary as cultural diplomacy
• Post/colonial appropriation and resistance in visual arts documentaries
• Representing visual aesthetic practices in ethnographic film
• Documenting performance and collaboration in the visual arts
• Documenting activist art practices
• Discourses of the visual artist in documentary film
• Documentaries about art institutions and markets
• Visual arts documentary as paratext (making of documentaries, exhibition documentaries)
• Relationship between documentary filmmaking and archival documentation of visual arts
• Histories of arts television networks and series
• Film technologies and the visual arts documentary
• Fakery, forgery and mockumentary

Deadline for electronic submission of 350-400 word abstract (plus brief biographical statement and sample 5- item bibliography): November 1, 2016. Notification by December 1, 2016.
Commissioned chapters should not exceed 5,000 words and must be completed by October 1, 2017.
Please send submissions and inquiries via email to Roger Hallas, Associate Professor of English (Film & Screen Studies), Syracuse University, USA: rhallas@syr.edu

Kate Hennessy

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May 27, 2016

SAPIENS’ Call for Photo Essays

May 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

Print

In January 2016, the Wenner-Gren Foundation launched SAPIENS, an editorially independent online publication devoted to popularizing anthropological research to an international, general-interest audience.

The foundation is bringing substantial resources to the project to sustain a beautiful website, support an editorial staff (comprised of both anthropology experts and journalists), and promote the site with an active marketing strategy. We anticipate that the magazine is on track to become a leading site for news, features, commentaries, reviews, and more highlighting anthropological research. Since its launch, we already have had more than 200,000 readers from 206 countries and territories. We have syndication partnerships with Scientific American, Discover Magazine, Slate, and The Atlantic.

A vital part of our new magazine is photo essays. These consist of 6–12 images, an introduction, and accompanying captions. In the tradition of visual anthropology, we seek original, high-quality sets of images that convey a story or draw our readers into an important and memorable place in time. An introduction (typically 100–300 words) should provide context for the essay, and each image should be accompanied by a caption (up to 75 words) that provides context and adds more information and insight.

To date, we’ve been able to present a wide range of excellent photo essays, from a long piece on the immigration crisis, to an insider’s view of a hospital in Niger caring for women suffering from obstetric fistula, to a story of how the simple ladder used by Pueblo Indians reveals their complex cosmology, to the controversial convenience stores run by immigrants in Belgium, to an artistic meditation on Native American massacre sites in the United States.

Help us transform how the public understands anthropology. Review our guidelines and please consider pitching a photo essay to the editors at editor@sapiens.org.

 

 

 

Aynur Kadir

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May 10, 2016

*** LAST CHANCE TO SUBMIT FOR THE MAY 15 LATE DEADLINE***

May 10, 2016 | By | No Comments

2016 Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) Film & Media Festival – Minneapolis, MN

The Society for Visual Anthropology’s Film and Media Festival invites submissions for its 2016 Festival in the following categories: Ultrashort, Short, and Feature. Please submit your films via Withoutabox.

The Society for Visual Anthropology screens the best ethnographic films and video productions at our annual SVA Film & Media Festival, held in conjunction with the American Anthropological Association (AAA) Annual Meeting. This gives independent filmmakers as well as distributors broad access to a market of several thousand anthropologists and educators.

Ethnographic film and video defined broadly as works created as the result of ethnographic fieldwork or those which use, are informed by, or illustrate the principles of anthropological theory or methods.

For inquiries about this year’s festival in Minneapolis, please contact SVAFMF’s 2016 co-Directors Ulla D. Berg or Kathryn Ramey at svafilmfestival@gmail.com <mailto:svafilmfestival@gmail.com>
For more information about American Anthropology Associations and its annual meetings, please visit:www.aaanet.org/meetings <http://www.aaanet.org/meetings>
For more information about the Society for Visual Anthropology, please visit: http://societyforvisualanthropology.org/ <http://societyforvisualanthropology.org/>

Kate Hennessy

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February 22, 2016

2016 Visual Research Conference: Call for Proposals

February 22, 2016 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology’s Visual Research Conference will take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota this year, November 14-16, at the beginning of the American Anthropological Association meeting. An informal no-host dinner takes place on Monday night and interactive presentations take place all day Tuesday and until 3pM on Wednesday. The Visual Research Conference provides an opportunity for professionals and students to dialogue about visually engaged works-in-progress. There are no specific themes to follow, though we are most interested in new ideas and projects under development in the study of visual signification, visual communication, and visual forms of representation, and/or utilizing visual media (photo, film, web, polymedia, intermedia). Forty-five minute time slots allow for substantive presentations that include viewing of visual material as well as ample give-and-take with an actively participating audience. Further discussion takes place during poster presentations. Many informal discussion periods between the interactive formal presentations, plus conversations at lunch and dinner, create multiple situations for networking and exchange of ideas. Members and non-members of the American Anthropological Association and Society for Visual Anthropology are welcome and there is no charge to attend. This is a productive way to meet and interact with others who do anthropological and anthropologically-related visual research.

Abstracts of 250 words (but not more than 500 words) can be submitted through 12 midnight, Pacific Standard Time,  April 1, 2016 by clicking on the Visual Research Conference submission form link HERE.

PLEASE NOTE: this Visual Research Conference submission deadline on April 1 is EARLIER than the American Anthropological Association’s Annual Meeting submission deadline on April 15, so that the Visual Research Conference organizing committee has time to carefully review the submissions and invite the 2016 presenters. The Visual Research Conference is not the SVA Film and Media Festival, so if you want to screen a film, please refer to that link and submission.

For more information on the format of this lively event and how to submit a presentation, visit our page on the SVA web site or contact Dr. Tom Blakely (tdblakely@aol.com), Dr. Andrea Heckman (andreaheckman@earthlink.net), or Dr. Jerome Crowder (jecrowde@utmb.edu).

Kate Hennessy

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December 21, 2015

Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines 2016

December 21, 2015 | By | No Comments

15 – 18 November
University of Cape Town
South Africa
Conference Theme: Ethnographic Imaginings – Place, Space & Time
CFP now open
To register, visit www.cead.org.nz
With the 2016 theme—Ethnographic Imaginings: Place, Space, and Time—calls for contributors to explore ethnographies as located contextually within meaningful sites and temporal moments. The spaces, places and times we can imagine include explorations of rurality and urbanity, wild and tamed, critical and creative, sensual and cognitive, and contemporary and historicaland all ranges of creative impulse. All manner of ethnographies are welcomed, and the conference theme merely acts as a guide for possibilities. We invite contributors to experiment with traditional ethnography, as well as new methodologies and with new presentational formats such as dramatic, performance, poetic, visual, aromatic, tactile, video, auto-, fictional, and experimental forms of ethnography. 
Aynur Kadir

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April 20, 2015

Call for the 2015 Taiwan International Ethnographic Film Festival

April 20, 2015 | By | No Comments

Calling All Filmmakers!

The 2015 Taiwan International Ethnographic Film Festival is coming on 2-6 October 2015, to be held at the Wonderful Theatre in Taipei.

Entry submission deadline: 20 May 2015

TIEFF is organized by the Taiwan Association of Visual Ethnography (TAVE), a non-profit organization dedicated to greater public awareness of documentary and ethnographic films.

The central theme of the biennial’s 8th season, “Scenes of Life,” invites audiences to participate in a multicultural investigation of the human experience as told through diverse life stories.

We’re looking to screen films in the following categories:

A) Central Theme: Scenes of Life
Ethnographic films, produced at any time, which tell unique life stories that reveal our shared human experience.

B) New Vision:
Ethnographic films on any subject, completed between 2013 and 2015.

Please send us entries now, or recommend films that you feel the program shouldn’t miss!

Entry form, regulations, and festival info at
http://www.tieff.sinica.edu.tw

Inquiry – Please contact TIEFF at
tieff@gate.sinica.edu.tw

HU, Tai-Li, Festival President
Lin, Wenlin, Vice President
Tsai, Futuru C.L., Festival Director

Jerome

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March 14, 2015

2015 Visual Research Conference

March 14, 2015 | By | No Comments

The Visual Research Conference — held annually at the beginning of the American Anthropological Association meeting — in 2015 will take place in Denver, Colorado, November 16-18, with a no-host informal dinner on Monday evening at 7pm, and presentations and discussions all day Tuesday and until 3pm on Wednesday. The Visual Research Conference provides an opportunity for professionals and students to dialogue about visually interesting works-in-progress. 45 minute time slots allow for substantive presentations that include viewing of visual material as well as ample give-and-take with an actively participating audience. Informal discussion times in between the interactive formal presentations, plus conversations at lunch and dinner, create multiple situations for networking and exchange of ideas. Members and non-members are welcome and there is no charge to attend. This is a productive way to meet and interact with others who do anthropological and anthropologically-related research on visual signification, visual communication, and visual forms of representation.

Abstracts of approximately 250-500 words can be submitted through 11:59pm, Hawai’i Time, April 1, 2015 by clicking on the Visual Research Conference submission form link at societyforvisualanthropology.org/visual-research-conference.

PLEASE NOTE: this Visual Research Conference submission deadline on April 1 is EARLIER than the American Anthropological Association’s Annual Meeting submission deadline on April 15, so that the Visual Research Conference organizing committee has time to carefully review the submissions and invite the 2015 presenters.

Aynur Kadir

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March 8, 2015

2015 AAA ANNUAL MEETING: CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

March 8, 2015 | By | No Comments

The SVA welcomes a variety of individual paper and session proposals for consideration at this year’s Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado (November 18-22, 2015). The theme for the meeting isFamiliar Strange,” which provides a rich context for exploring the innovative and exciting work conducted under the broad rubric of visual anthropology.

For the 2015 Annual Meeting, the SVA programming committee consists of:

Susan Falls (sfalls@scad.edu) & Fiona P. McDonald (fionamcdonald5@yahoo.ca).

 

Susan and Fiona are more than happy to work with you on your paper, poster, or roundtable sessions. We are happy to assist session organizers with the structuring of their proposals. The SVA encourages innovative formats, including poster sessions, extended screening of visual materials, and fostering more dynamic discussion periods. For all submissions, participants must abide by the AAA rules regarding roles, registration, deadlines, and fees. No exceptions.

 

There a many different ways for members to participate in the AAA meetings through the SVA. All submissions are due April 15, 2015 unless otherwise indicated. The online abstract submission system opens for all proposal types on February 18, 2015.

Here are the types of submissions possible:

Panels and Sessions

Executive Panels   (Due Feb 17: the online application system is currently open) 

Section Invited Sessions (Due April 15) 

Volunteered Sessions (Due April 15)

Other

Individually Volunteered Papers &Posters

Retrospective Sessions

Public Policy Forums

Media Submissions

Special Events

Installations

Section Invited & Volunteered Roundtables

Visit here for a description of each submission type:

http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/presenters/ProposalSubmissionTypes.cfm

 

Most popular SVA submissions categories:

Volunteered Papers/Posters/Roundtables/Sessions – Due April 15, 2015

To submit a session, go to AAA website and follow the links to the call for papers. A session abstract of up to 500 words is required. Meeting registration forms and fees must be submitted for each participant. Submission deadline is 5:00 pm EST (10:00 pm GMT) April 15, 2015. Be sure to indicate if you wish the SVA to review your submission.

 

SVA Sponsored Session Proposals – Due April 15, 2015 online

This includes all paper and poster sessions, roundtable proposals, and individual paper/poster submissions. All Invited Session Proposals (paper or poster sessions) must include a session abstract of up to 500 words and information for all participants (including individual abstracts and any technical needs for your session). Submission will be through the AAA website. We highly encourage anyone planning to submit an invited session proposal to contact us ASAP, ideally by March 1, 2015.

Media SubmissionsDue April 15, 2015
SVA continues to welcome interactive media work and also encourages short work that is under 15 minutes.  DVD formats are acceptable. Submitted materials will not be returned.

Installations – Due April 15, 2015 online through the AAA Programming Committee

Installations invite anthropological knowledge off the beaten path of the written conference paper. Presenters may propose performances, recitals, conversations, author-meets-critic roundtables, salon reading workshops, oral history recording sessions and other alternative, creative forms of intellectual expression for consideration. Selected Installations will be curated for off-site exhibition and tied to the official AAA conference program.

 

2015 SVA Film and Media Festival Submissions – Due April 15, 2015

Contact SVA 2015 Directors:

Ulla Berg (uberg@rci.rutgers.edu)

                 Naomi Schiller (NSchiller@brooklyn.cuny.edu)

The SVA Film and Media Festival encourage the submission of short works (under 30 minutes), feature-length ethnographic films, and interactive media. Awards will be given to the best works in a number of categories, including student films and short films. Festival submissions open February 1, 2015. Early-bird discounts for March 15, 2015. The regular submission deadline is April 15, 2015. Late-deadline is May 1, 2015. Please check the SVA Film and Media Festival Without A Box submission page for complete details (including information on where to send your previews).

https://www.withoutabox.com/03film/03t_fin/03t_fin_fest_01over.php?festival_id=10082

 

SVA Visual Research Conference SubmissionsDue April 1, 2015 online via the SVA Website: www.societyforvisualanthropology.org

Contacts: Tom Blakely (tdblakely@aol.com and copy to tdb5@psu.edu)

                  Andrea Heckman (andreaheckman@earthlink.net)

                  Jerome Crowder (jecrowde@utmb.edu)

The SVA Visual Research Conference provides a collegial environment for the presentation of works-in-progress. This Conference especially emphasizes much interaction among the presenters and an “actively participating audience”, and anyone interested is welcome to attend. The Visual Research Conference will take place November 16-18 (Monday 7pm no-host dinner; Tuesday 9am-6pm, Wednesday 9am-3pm).

Check the SVA website for deadline updates

Kate Hennessy

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February 18, 2015

ISEA 2015: Ethnographic Terminalia Workshop CFP

February 18, 2015 | By | No Comments

Workshop Call for Proposals
Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art

ISEAheader

Saturday, August 15th, 2015, Vancouver B.C.
ISEA 2015

Deadline for proposal submission: March 30th, 2015
ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Organizers: Ethnographic Terminalia Curatorial Collective: Kate Hennessy (Simon Fraser University), Trudi Lynn Smith (University of Victoria), Craig Campbell (University of Texas, Austin), Fiona P. McDonald (New Knowledge Organization, Ltd.), Stephanie Takaragawa (Chapman University); with Glenn Alteen (grunt gallery) and Tarah Hogue (grunt gallery)

Abstract

Since 2009, the Ethnographic Terminalia Curatorial Collective has staged annual exhibitions in major North American cities (Washington D.C., Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Montreal, New Orleans, Philadelphia) that explore the intersections of art and anthropology. Archives, ephemera, and Indigenous articulations of new media, identity, culture, language, and resistance have emerged as central themes in contemporary art-ethnographic practice and as a central interest to the curatorial work of the collective. New technologies, both materially and conceptually, present opportunities to push theoretical, disciplinary, and aesthetic boundaries. However, the implications of digitization and circulation of archival information present particularly interesting challenges for artists and scholars who seek to represent and exploit the potential of digital archives. Building on the collective’s recent exhibitions, and in conjunction with an exhibition of new media artist Geronimo Inutiq’s Arctic Noise project, co-curated for ISEA 2015 at the grunt gallery in Vancouver (Terminal City), Ethnographic Terminalia invites workshop participants to demonstrate and discuss electronic art works and theoretical frameworks that disrupt material, figurative, discursive, cultural, and political manifestations of the archive, broadly conceived. Our discussions of new technologies and archives will culminate in an experimentation with form: the outcome of the workshop will be a collectively hand-made archive/catalogue of the event that will be later digitized and circulated.

CALL FOR PROPOSALS

We seek proposals for presentations in our one-day workshop based on the following format:

1) 5-minute theoretical proposals that take up the 2015 ISEA theme of disruption, as it relates to the archive and its expression in new media

2) 5-minute theoretical proposals that take up the theme of the Terminus, as it relates to the archive and its expression in new media

3) 5-minute theoretical proposals that take up the theme of the New Forms, as it relates to the archive and its expression in new media

4) 15-minute artist statement/demonstrations of artworks that have engaged the archive in a new media / electronic expression.

More: http://ethnographicterminalia.org

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