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Kate Hennessy

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February 24, 2016

Funded PhD positions – Max Planck Institute, Jena, Germany

February 24, 2016 | By | No Comments

The Minds and Traditions research group (“the Mint”), an Independent Max Planck Research Group at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena (Germany) is offering two grants for two doctoral projects focusing on “cognitive science and cultural evolution of visual culture and graphic codes“.

Funding is available for four years (three years renewable twice for six months), starting inSeptember 2016.

The PhD students will be expected to take part in a research project investigating the evolution of graphic codes and the rise of writing.

If interested, please send a motivation letter (maximum two pages) to the group’s principal investigator, Olivier Morin (morin@shh.mpg.de) by March the 21st, 2016.

Full details can be downloaded here (pdf).

Kate Hennessy

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February 22, 2016

2016 Visual Research Conference: Call for Proposals

February 22, 2016 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology’s Visual Research Conference will take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota this year, November 14-16, at the beginning of the American Anthropological Association meeting. An informal no-host dinner takes place on Monday night and interactive presentations take place all day Tuesday and until 3pM on Wednesday. The Visual Research Conference provides an opportunity for professionals and students to dialogue about visually engaged works-in-progress. There are no specific themes to follow, though we are most interested in new ideas and projects under development in the study of visual signification, visual communication, and visual forms of representation, and/or utilizing visual media (photo, film, web, polymedia, intermedia). Forty-five minute time slots allow for substantive presentations that include viewing of visual material as well as ample give-and-take with an actively participating audience. Further discussion takes place during poster presentations. Many informal discussion periods between the interactive formal presentations, plus conversations at lunch and dinner, create multiple situations for networking and exchange of ideas. Members and non-members of the American Anthropological Association and Society for Visual Anthropology are welcome and there is no charge to attend. This is a productive way to meet and interact with others who do anthropological and anthropologically-related visual research.

Abstracts of 250 words (but not more than 500 words) can be submitted through 12 midnight, Pacific Standard Time,  April 1, 2016 by clicking on the Visual Research Conference submission form link HERE.

PLEASE NOTE: this Visual Research Conference submission deadline on April 1 is EARLIER than the American Anthropological Association’s Annual Meeting submission deadline on April 15, so that the Visual Research Conference organizing committee has time to carefully review the submissions and invite the 2016 presenters. The Visual Research Conference is not the SVA Film and Media Festival, so if you want to screen a film, please refer to that link and submission.

For more information on the format of this lively event and how to submit a presentation, visit our page on the SVA web site or contact Dr. Tom Blakely (tdblakely@aol.com), Dr. Andrea Heckman (andreaheckman@earthlink.net), or Dr. Jerome Crowder (jecrowde@utmb.edu).

Kate Hennessy

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December 21, 2015

Contemporary Ethnography Across the Disciplines 2016

December 21, 2015 | By | No Comments

15 – 18 November
University of Cape Town
South Africa
Conference Theme: Ethnographic Imaginings – Place, Space & Time
CFP now open
To register, visit www.cead.org.nz
With the 2016 theme—Ethnographic Imaginings: Place, Space, and Time—calls for contributors to explore ethnographies as located contextually within meaningful sites and temporal moments. The spaces, places and times we can imagine include explorations of rurality and urbanity, wild and tamed, critical and creative, sensual and cognitive, and contemporary and historicaland all ranges of creative impulse. All manner of ethnographies are welcomed, and the conference theme merely acts as a guide for possibilities. We invite contributors to experiment with traditional ethnography, as well as new methodologies and with new presentational formats such as dramatic, performance, poetic, visual, aromatic, tactile, video, auto-, fictional, and experimental forms of ethnography. 
Kate Hennessy

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December 16, 2015

Visual Anthropology Review: Call for Co-Editor

December 16, 2015 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology invites applications for the co-editorship of its journal, Visual Anthropology Review (VAR). One of the current co-editors will finish his service to VAR in May 2016, and SVA seeks an individual to transition into the position of a new co-editor during the Spring 2016 semester. The typical period for a co-editorship is three years.

If you are interested in applying for the position, please email a letter of intent and a CV to the current co-editors: Jenny Chio (jenny.chio@emory.edu) and Mark Westmoreland (m.r.westmoreland@fsw.leidenuniv.nl). Please also direct any questions about the position to Jenny Chio and Mark Westmoreland. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis, beginning January 4, 2016.

About the Position
VAR is a biannual academic, peer-reviewed journal that publishes 12-15 articles per year. The co-editors are assisted by the journal’s film review editor and two book review editors, who manage the publication of 15-20 book and film reviews per year.

Qualifications of the Co-Editor:

·      A PhD in Anthropology and a background of teaching, research and publishing in fields related to visual anthropology.

·       Proven organizational and editorial skills.

·       Interest in online multi-media publishing.

Responsibilities of the Co-Editor:

·       Edit the journal under the protocols established by Wiley-Blackwell and the American Anthropological Association.

·       Work with Wiley-Blackwell to maintain the established workflow, to meet the  deadlines and requirements for two issues per year.

·       Solicit articles and suggest ideas for special issues or articles.

·       Receive articles and manage them through the review process. This involves maintaining records on each submitted article; engaging two reviewers for a “double-blind” peer review for each article; reading the submitted articles and the peer reviews and contacting the authors as to the final decision.

·       Work with website managers from SVA and Wiley-Blackwell to contribute, update, and maintain content online, including video and other multi-media content.

·       Supervise and recruit, as needed, the VAR editorial assistant.

·      Attend publishing, editorial, and SVA Board meetings during the annual AA conference over the duration of the co-editorship.

About the Journal
Visual Anthropology Review is published by the American Anthropological Association and promotes the discussion of visual studies, broadly conceived.

From independent cinema to indigenous media, ethnographic portraiture to Hollywood headshots, street style to narcocultura, VAR has already become the go-to journal for cutting-edge anthropological work on visual media, and we are very optimistic about the future of the journal as we expand into new modes and domains. VAR is currently in the process of re-imagining and re-creating its publishing model to better reflect and support the visual, multi-media, and experimental work being produced by visual anthropologists today. VAR aims to be a leader in scholarly promotion and critique of experimental ethnographic work by developing multi-media platform for more dynamic content.

We welcome articles, photo-essays, reviews, and commentary on the use of multimedia, still photography, film, video, and non-camera-generated images. We have also begun a new series of online “Supplements” for individual articles and issues, providing teaching-related content and additional online materials related to recently published pieces.

The journal has produced special issues on topics such as “Ethnographic Filmmaking in China,” “Engaging Visual Anthropology in the Entangled Lives of Species,” “Visual Representations of Aboriginal Australia,” “HIV/AIDS Education and Southern Africa,” and “Visual Latin America.”

VAR has an international readership and publishes work by scholars and artists throughout the world. The journal’s reputation is bolstered by its Editorial Board that includes more than twenty internationally distinguished academics and practitioners, including Peter Biella, Amahl Bishara, John Bishop, Tom Blakely, Liam Buckley, Jennifer Deger, Elizabeth Edwards, Tejaswini Ganti, Faye Ginsburg, Anna Grimshaw, Tim Ingold, John L. Jackson Jr., Dorinne Kondo, Laura Lewis, Brent Luvaas, David MacDougall, Jonathan Marion, Leighton Peterson, Christopher Pinney, Arnd Schneider, Karen Strassler, and Christopher Wright.

If you have an interest in pushing cutting-edge visual scholarship, exploring online and open-access publishing models, and adding your critical expertise to the development of VAR over the next few years, then please consider submitting your application.

Mark Westmoreland & Jenny Chio
Co-Editors, Visual Anthropology Review
Society for Visual Anthropology
American Anthropological Association

Contact Details:
Jenny Chio
Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Emory University
Atlanta GA 30322
jenny.chio@emory.edu

Mark R. Westmoreland
Associate Professor of Visual Anthropology
Leiden University
2300 RB Leiden
The Netherlands
m.r.westmoreland@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

Kate Hennessy

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November 17, 2015

2015 SVA AAA Program now available

November 17, 2015 | By | No Comments

The 2015 SVA Program Committee (Susan Falls and Fiona P. McDonald) are happy to announce the 2015 SVA Program. You won’t want to miss any of this year’s amazing Film and Media Festival, SVA workshops, roundtables, sessions, Installations, and parties! Download the 2015 SVA AAA Meeting Program here so that you can be sure to connect to all of the people and media you want to see.

Rachel Ward

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November 4, 2015

New Issue of Visual Anthropology Review (2015 Vol. 31 No. 2)

November 4, 2015 | By | No Comments

The latest issue of Visual Anthropology Review is out now and is full of exciting articles about painting as thick description, contemporary Aboriginal photography, video activism in Mexico, Somali refugees using social media in India, and the development of an audiovisual archive of everyday life in Indonesia. plus interviews with filmmakers David MacDougall and Shashwati Talukdar. It is available on AnthroSource and through Wiley-Blackwell.

Kate Hennessy

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October 26, 2015

Ethnographic Terminalia Presents ‘Aeolian Politics’, Denver 2015

October 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Denver, CO. November 17-22, 2015
Emmanuel Gallery

In the midst of this boom of writing and thinking and worrying about the end of the world brought on by anthropogenic climate catastrophes, Ethnographic Terminalia presents Aeolian Politics.  It is indeed the end of time for glaciers that have withstood thousands of years, cycling through periods of freeze and thaw.  It is the end of time for entire species extinguished at such an alarming rate that even the most hardened observer of the ‘news’ must be a little shaken and perturbed.

It is in this moment that we have enthusiastically collaborated with Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer to translate their work, Aeolian Politics, into an exhibition. We all inhabit the weather world, regardless of the little shelters built to insulate us from the elements. The banal familiarity of the seasons as they wash over us no longer require studied effort to estrange them.  Strange weather is here.  The force of this world—which we re-engineered through centuries of mining, fossil-fuel burning, over-fishing, agro-industrial growth, and so on—imposes itself upon our everyday so that we must make a constant effort to make the strange familiar and pretend that everything will be okay. At times the veneer of a stable and predictable life seems terribly thin.

We welcome you to explore the Windhouse, a gallery within a gallery, caught up in an airy torrent of wind politics where the materiality of Zapotec words invoke the weird familiarity of wind in the weather world.

Emmanuel Gallery
November 17-22, 2015
1205 10th Street, Denver, CO 80204
http://www.emmanuelgallery.org/

Opening Reception Friday 20 November 7pm – 11:30 pm

For more information please visit our website and Press Release

etap2015-card-v3

Kate Hennessy

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October 26, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Jonathan Westin on Uncertainty in Historical Visualizations

October 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

Jonathan Westin’s “Inking a Past: Visualization as a Shedding of Uncertainty” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014) uses Actor-Network Theory to understand how a visualization studio renders representations of the past.
Questions for classroom discussion:

1. When thinking of the past, for instance Medieval Times or Antiquity, what images form in your mind and how do you differ between the different time periods? Are there certain elements you “include” in your mental image that gives you cues?

2. How does the visualization work of SIF (Studio InkLink Firenze) compare to previous efforts to visualize ancient Rome and other past societies? What are the dominant trends in archeological visualization today?

3. The article describes how an illustration is created through a series of steps that bring shape and form to an initial idea. Is any one step more important than another, and who is the most influential actant in this chain of procedures?

4. The article concludes that it is better to speculate than to only reconstruct what is certain. What dangers lies in both of these approaches respectively, and what are the advantages?

5. How do you think the insights and concepts of Actor-Network Theory can benefit visual anthropologists in their work?

6. One of the most controversial elements of an ANT perspective is the endowing of objects and other nun-human elements with agency, that is, interpreting them as actants within a larger actor-network. What does such a move do to anthropological theory? How does it complicate or clarify the interpretative work of anthropologists?

7. Is it time for an ANT analysis of the field of anthropology itself? Have we escaped the interrogative lens of STS work for too long?

Links:

 

Kate Hennessy

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October 3, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Ethan Sharp on Narcocultura at the Mexican Military Museum

October 3, 2015 | By | No Comments

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

Ethan Sharp’s “Visualizing Narcocultura: Violent Media, the Mexican Military’s Museum of Drugs, and Transformative Culture” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014) explores the museumification of drug culture in Mexico as a pedagogical dimension of the drug war.

Sharp1

The following set of questions and resources provide pedagogical tools to be used in undergraduate courses.

Questions for classroom discussion:

  1. What are some insights that you would expect to gain into drug trafficking and the drug war from a visit to the Mexican military’s museum of drugs? What are some insights that the museum might provide that are not available at other sites or in other forms of media?
  2. Why does the Mexican military have a museum of drugs? Why is the museum closed to the general public? Why has the Mexican military allowed journalists and other media professionals to disseminate reports about and photos of the museum in recent years?
  3. How are representations of narocultura in the museum similar to and different from representations of narcocultura in other media, such as television shows, narcocorridos, and films?
  4. What are some of the different ways in which you can interpret the representations of narocultura in the museum? For example, how does the museum promote or celebrate narcocultura? How does it denigrate narcocultura? How does it undermine or move beyond the concept of narcocultura?
  5. How do museums contribute to processes of self-discipline and self-reform? Do you agree that the Mexican military’s museum of drugs contributes to self-discipline and self-reform? Why or why not?
  6. Is it possible to develop a critique of the military and its strategies through the museum? If so, how?
  7. Can you imagine some better uses of the museum, or some ways in which the museum could be re-developed? Do you think that the museum should be opened to the general public? Why or why not?

Sharp2

Additional resources:
Links to representations of the museum in the media that are referenced in footnotes:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/13/AR2010011304573.html

Links to other representations of the museum in the media:

http://www.pri.org/stories/2010-01-26/mexico-citys-drug-museum

Links to blogs that provide information about the drug war in Mexico. These blogs occasionally provide links to videos posted by drug trafficking organizations, as well as videos and other resources posted by citizen journalists.

http://www.blogdelnarco.com/

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/

Other forms of media that are mentioned in the article are narcorridos and telenovelas that feature drug traffickers. The following are links to youtube videos that are trailers for telenovelas and/or videos produced by well-known performers of narcocorridos. I have provided short explanations for each one.

A video by Los Tigres del Norte featuring the corrido of La Reina del Sur. La Reina del Sur was a novel about a woman who became a drug trafficker. The novel was made into a television serial in Mexico: 

A trailer for the television serial “Camelia la Tejana,” which is based on a corrido originally performed by Los Tigres del Norte (the song that is performed in the trailer is the corrido of Camelia la Tejana): 

Video created for the corrido “El Ejecutor” by El Komander: 

A documentary film entitled “Narcocultura,” recently released on DVD provides a very good introduction to the drug war in Mexico and the different forms of media associated with narcocultura. The following is a link to the trailer for the film. 

Sharp4

Kate Hennessy

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September 11, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Deborah Matzner on South Asian Soundscapes

September 11, 2015 | By | No Comments

Deborah Matzner’s article on “Jai Bhim Comrade and the Politics of Sound in Urban Indian Visual Culture” in Visual Anthropology Review examines the sonic practices of the Dalit movement in Maharashtra as depicted by Indian documentary filmmaker Anand Patwardhan.

Figure 5 Megaphone on Taxi

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