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Aynur Kadir

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October 13, 2016

Workshop Announcement and Call for Participants

October 13, 2016 | By | No Comments

A PITCH SESSION FOR ETHNOGRAPHIC FILMMAKERS: DEVELOPING YOUR STORY, INTEGRATING YOUR RESEARCH, FINDING FUNDING AND DISTRIBUTION   (3-0700)

Workshops

Thursday, November 17

1:00 PM – 5:00 PM

 Are you currently working on a film? Are you interested in getting feedback?
Are you interested in ethnographic film production but not yet ready to share a project in progress?
 Please join us at the AAA for a new Society for Visual Anthropology workshop:

This workshop uses the pitch format of documentary film festivals in which filmmakers pitch their work-in-progress to a jury of funders, distributors and award winning filmmakers. For each film presented, the jury will provide feedback including strategies for visualizing anthropological content and suggestions for developing your narrative and structure. Other discussion topics include conceptualizing your audience, and opportunities and strategies for funding and distribution.

Pre- Selected filmmakers will give a10 minute presentation of their project, that includes a description of the story, themes, research, visual style, plans for completion and a short video sample. Our workshop format is intended to encourage lively discussion between jurors, other workshop participants and the presenting filmmakers. Discussion will address both the effectiveness of the pitch and the substance of the film project. Jury and audience awards. The goals of the workshop:

  1. To model how to present a film project to potential collaborators, funders & distributors.
  2. To provide concrete strategies for turning research into visually compelling stories.
  3. To direct participants to funding and distribution opportunities.

Pitch jurors include:

Camilla Nielsson, Filmmaker/Anthropologist, Director, DEMOCRATS

Sarah Elder, Director, DRUMS OF WINTER: UKSUUM CAUYAI, SVA Film Festival Juror, Prof. of Documentary Film, SUNY Buffalo

Alice Apley, Executive Director, Documentary Educational Resources (DER)

Following the Pitch session, Leslie Aiello, from the Wenner-Gren Foundation will make a brief presentation about the Fejos Ethnographic Film Fellowship.

Two ways to participate in this workshop

PITCH YOUR PROJECT: Whether your project is in development, production, or in rough cut stage, this is an opportunity to get feedback on your work-in-progress from a jury with expertise in anthropological filmmaking, funding and distribution. Seven filmmakers (or filmmaking teams) will be selected to pitch projects. Those interested in presenting their film project should send a brief Pitch Proposal (see below) to Alice Apley (alice@der.org) by OCTOBER 21, 2016. The organizers will select a mix of experienced  to first-time filmmakers.

NONPITCHING WORKSHOP PARTICIPANTS: As a workshop participant, you can observe the pitches,join the discussion about the projects in progress, learn from the pitches, get ideas, and plan for a future visual project.

Pitch Proposal – If you are interested in pitching, send a one-page description of your project and a video sample. It should include:

  • Short synopsis describing the significance of the project, brief discussion of the issues, themes and story you will explore, and the visual style of the film (e.g. observational, experimental documentary etc).
  • Your bio, including your unique qualifications for completing this project successfully, such as knowledge, skills, access or history of involvement with the characters and/or subject matter.
  • Please also include a short status report describing where you are in the research, development and/or production process, what work has been completed and a brief timeline.
  • Production-related photo (optional).

Also send a trailer, teaser, or clips via a single streamable link of film footage or visuals (still or moving). (7 minutes maximum)

For questions, email Alice Apley, alice@der.org or Sarah Elder, selder@buffalo.edu

Kate Hennessy

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September 23, 2016

Ohio University, Tenure-track Position

September 23, 2016 | By | No Comments

The Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Ohio University invites applications for a full-time, tenure-track Assistant Professor of Anthropology in cultural anthropology with specialization in visual and media anthropology. Geographical area is open. Ideal candidates will conduct research that is theoretically and ethnographically innovative and will be committed to excellence in undergraduate teaching. The successful candidate will be expected to teach upper-level courses in Ethnographic Methods and Anthropological Theory and their areas of expertise, as well as Introduction to Cultural Anthropology. The successful candidate will be expected to develop and strengthen program resources and opportunities relating to museum studies, including building connections with museum programs and institutions on campus and in the community. The position start date will be August 2017.

Housed in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, the Anthropology Program (www.ohio.edu/socanth/anthropology/) consists of 7 full-time faculty and approximately 100 majors, and maintains a core focus on public engagement and outreach across the subfields. This focus provides opportunities for undergraduate students through community-based research and learning such as internships, field schools, independent research projects, and study abroad opportunities. Anthropology faculty teach 2 courses per semester. Ohio University (http://www.ohio.edu/) is a Research Extensive institution that serves more than 20,000 students on a residential campus in Athens, Ohio, a college town seventy-five miles southeast of Columbus, Ohio.

To apply online, go to http://www.ohiouniversityjobs.com/postings/20405 and submit a letter of application; curriculum vitae; research statement and one representative scholarly publication (attached as combined pdf file under “Research Interest”); statement of teaching philosophy; evidence of teaching effectiveness including recent teaching evaluations and two sample syllabi (attached as a combined pdf file under “Other” document type); and contact information for three professional references. Letters of recommendation will be requested after an initial screening of candidates to minimize inconvenience to applicants and referees.

Ph.D. in Anthropology is required by the start date. Review of application materials will begin on October 16, 2016 and the position will remain open until filled. For full consideration, please apply by October 31, 2016. Questions may be directed to Haley Duschinski, Search Committee Chair, at duschins@ohio.edu. All positions require final university approval.

Ohio University is committed to creating a respectful and inclusive educational and workplace environment. Ohio University is an equal access/equal opportunity and affirmative action employer with a strong commitment to building and maintaining a diverse workforce. Women, persons of color, persons with disabilities, and veterans are encouraged to apply. Ohio University is a member of the OH/Western PA/WV Higher Education Recruitment Consortium. www.ohwpawvherc.org.

Kate Hennessy

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August 14, 2016

Funded Fellowships, Filmmakers Without Borders

August 14, 2016 | By | No Comments

FILMMAKERS WITHOUT BORDERS is offering fully-funded Fellowships for visual anthropology work in Bhutan.

FILMMAKERS WITHOUT BORDERS is a 501c3 nonprofit organization that provides fully-funded overseas fellowships to filmmakers/art educators to teach filmmaking, media literacy, and technology to underserved students in Africa, Asia, & Latin America.

– Live and teach in Thimphu, Bhutan for 10-12 months
– Teach filmmaking, media literacy, & 21st century technology skills to students for ~25 hours/week
– Shoot/edit x10+ video vignettes
– Shoot/edit x2 short film projects

– Flights provided
– Housing provided
– Food provided
– Equipment provided

– Other Fellowships: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Honduras, India, Morocco, Navajo Nation, Nepal, Tanzania, Thailand

Apply at developingfilmmakers.org by September 15th.

 

Kate Hennessy

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July 27, 2016

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: David Kloos on Future Archives and Everyday Life in Indonesia

July 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions   

David Kloos’s “Living in a Makeshift World: Mobility, Temporariness, and Everyday Life in Indonesia” (VAR 31-2, Fall 2015) uses images from Recording the Future (RtF): An Audiovisual Archive of Everyday Life in Indonesia to analyze the experiences and agencies of domestic migrants in Indonesia. The following set of questions and resources provide teaching tools for use in both graduate and undergraduate courses.

Questions for classroom discussion
Content

  1. How does internal migration change Indonesian society? How do social, economic and political changes, including the forces of globalization, change the practices and experiences of internal migrants?
  1. Is it useful to call Indonesian domestic migrants a class, or – in the words of Johan Lindquist – part of the Indonesian “underclass”? Why (not)?
  1. What is meant with the concept of “everyday life”? How does it differ from other approaches, within anthropology and other disciplines? Do you find the concept useful as an analytical category? Why (not)?

Methods

  1. What information does RtF provide about the lives and positions of internal migrants? How does this information differ from other (oral or textual) types of information, as provided, for example, in policy reports or (written) ethnographic descriptions? What are the limitations of verbal/textual and visual sources?
  1. What can visual sources – and the rich information it contains about dress, built environment, the use of (public or private) space, material objects, and body language – tell us about the expression, salience or relative (in)visibility of class?
  1. What can a resource like RtF tell us about processes of place-making, in Indonesia and elsewhere? More generally, what do you think visual images can tell us about the social relations and meanings involved in the imagination, demarcation, or “making” of particular places (a neighborhood, a village, a house or compound, a harbor, a marketplace, shop or a restaurant, and so forth)?
  1. What are the various levels of mediation in RtF? In your opinion, how should a scholar working with this (or similar) material in order to engage in scholarly analysis, deal with its mediated nature?
  1. RtF – and related projects like the British Mass Observation project (see below) – seek to record or register aspects of human life that are generally seen as self-evident or “ordinary,” and thereby (apparently) unimportant. Can you think of aspects in your own society, that are so ordinary that no one every seems to record it or give it much thought? Would it be worth your or anyone’s while to film or write about it? What if it is forgotten? Would this be bad? Why (not)?
  1. Technology is changing fast. Around the world, many or most people have a mobile phone with a built-in camera and an internet connection. How should this affect longitudinal projects like RtF? Is it still necessary to make these systematized recordings? Is a resource like RtF gradually replaced or made unnecessary by online video archives like Youtube? Why (not)?
  1. What role does sound play in an audiovisual archive like RtF? In the videos, what kind of sounds do you hear? Would it be useful to focus the analysis on sounds, rather than images? What kind of questions might be asked?

Modes of representation

  1. What are the advantages of combining text and image in scholarly analysis? Should there be a hierarchy, or not? How can text engage with image and the other way around? Does it require a particular “writing” style? Does it require particular tools?

Additional information about Recording the Future, sources of inspiration and possible comparisons

For more information about Recording the Future and its various products, see the project website, and this essay by project coordinators Henk Schulte Nordholt and Fridus Steijlen. For more clips from the archive, see the RtF Youtube channel.

Important sources of inspiration for RtF, also useful for discussion in class, are Mass Observation (1937-present, currently housed by the University of Sussex) and Michael Apted’s UP Series (see, among others, this useful debate in Ethnography), with the main difference that RtF follows places rather than people. Recording the Future can also be contextualized in a more recent trend of sensory ethnography projects; See a brief discussion here.

Additional products and related questions

The film “Don’t forget to remember me” (Fridus Steijlen and Henk Schulte Nordholt, 2008) features “a day in the life of Indonesia.”

Questions:

  1. According to one reviewer, the choice on the part of the directors to minimize (textual) context and let the images speak for themselves is both a strength and “a major weakness”? What is your opinion?
  2. This film has been used on multiple occasions for educational purposes, evoking radically different responses. Some viewers appreciated it for its insights and critical approach. Others judged it as “neocolonial.” How can we explain these divergent assessments? What elements in the film might account for these respective judgments?
  3. How does this film compare to Ridley’s Scott/Youtube’s “Life in a Day”?

The documentary “Being prominent in Indonesia,” (Ahmad Baihaki and Fridus Steijlen, 2011) is a portrait of Ibu Mooryati Soedibyo, an influential Indonesian business woman and politician. As, generally speaking, RtF is biased toward the lives of less affluent people, this film shows another, less prominent side of the archive.

Questions:

  1. The article “Living in a Makeshift World” looks at the vocabulary of makeshift, as embedded in senses of transience, improvisation and future dreams and aspiration. How does Ibu Mooryati’s choice of words compare to this? Does it communicate a different kind of temporality?
  2. What kind of spaces does Ibu Mooryati inhabit or use? How are these spaces connected and/or separated from the public spaced inhabited by less affluent people? What information does RtF provide with regard to the (possible) physical interactions between different social classes in contemporary Indonesia?

The short film “A day in the life of a mall,” (Andy Fuller, 2011) makes use of (embedded) written citations in order to make an argument. What do you think of this method? Is this a good way to construct a (scholarly argument on the basis of these images? Why (not)?

Kate Hennessy

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July 27, 2016

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Monique Scott on reframing anthropology exhibitions for contemporary audiences

July 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

Monique Scott from Visual Anthropology Review on Vimeo.

Monique Scott’s video interview about her review, “White Walls, ‘Black City’: Reflections on “Exhibition as Residency—Art, Anthropology, Collaboration” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014), which discusses efforts to resuscitate the image of the anthropology exhibitions for contemporary audiences. Her review specifically considers the exhibition organized by Ethnographic Terminalia at the Arts Incubator in Washington Park, South Chicago, in 2013.

Kate Hennessy

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July 27, 2016

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Jennifer Hubbert on the Iconicity and reappropriation of Tank Man

July 27, 2016 | By | No Comments

Jennifer Hubbert from Visual Anthropology Review on Vimeo.

Jennifer Hubbert’s video interview about her article “Appropriating Iconicity: Why Tank Man Still Matters” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014), which explores the reappropriation of iconic photographs, examining what happens when the iconic “Tank Man” image is modified and repurposed to new political ends.

Kate Hennessy

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July 22, 2016

Call for Projectionists, SVA Film Festival, 2016

July 22, 2016 | By | No Comments

Dear colleagues,

We are looking for three graduate students, undergraduates, or filmmakers to work as projectionists at the 2016 Society for Visual Anthropology’s Film and Media Festival as part of the upcoming AAA meetings in Minneapolis, Minnesota. The position involves about 10 hours of work projecting an amazing line-up of films. We need people who are technologically savvy and highly responsible. This is a paid position and, in addition, the projectionists will get a AAA registration waiver.

If interested, send a note of interest and a CV to Kathryn Ramey at Kathryn_Ramey@emerson.edu<mailto:Kathryn_Ramey@emerson.edu>

Best regards,
Kathryn Ramey and Ulla D. Berg
Co-Directors, 2016 SVA Film and Media Festival

Kate Hennessy

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July 21, 2016

Deadline Friday July 22, 2016 — AAA Meeting Logo Design Competition

July 21, 2016 | By | No Comments

Overview

The 116th Annual Meeting of the American Anthropological Association will be held in Washington, D.C. with the theme of Anthropology Matters! Every year the association develops a logo which represents the annual meeting location and/or theme. This year we are looking for your input! We want to see your visual interpretation of the theme.  The winner will work with a committee and a professional designer to produce the final logo.

Eligibility

Contestants are permitted to work in groups, but their entry will be considered as one and will be eligible to win a single prize.

Guidelines

  • Your logo concept should be reflective of the 2017 conference destination, Washington, D.C. and/or the theme for the conference.
  • Your logo concept should not include references, symbols, or messages that may be deemed offensive, discriminatory, or inappropriate.
  • Your logo should include the name of the meeting “116th Annual Meeting of the AAA”, the location “Washington, D.C.,” and the date “November 29 – December 3, 2017.”

Download the official entry form with full guidelines here. 

Selection & Prize

  • A panel comprised of members of the Program Committee, will select one (1) winning entry, and their decision will be final. The winner will be notified by email and announced on the AAA website and social media platforms. The panel reserves the right to declare the contest deserted, to cancel it, or to disqualify any entry that does not conform to the guidelines.
  • Submissions should be made electronically to aaameetings@americananthro.org, including the entry form, and the logo concept in the format described above, as attachments with subject line <Logo Contest 2016>. The deadline to submit entries is July 22, 2016 at midnight Eastern Standard Time (-5 GMT), and decisions will be made by July 31, 2016.
  • Submissions will be judged on their visual appeal, their adherence to the concept and themes outlined above, quality of design, creativity, and ease of reproduction and manipulation.
  • The prize for the winning entry will include:
    • Special recognition during the conference and on the AAA website.
    • One complimentary registration to the 2017 Annual Meeting (up to $444 in value).
    • Four night stay at the conference hotel during the 2017 Annual Meeting (up to $1,300 value).
    • Prizes can are not exchangeable or transferable to other dates, or people and have no cash value.
  • Any queries should be addressed to: aaameetings@americananthro.org.

Timeline

  • June 22 – Logo Contest Launches
  • July 22 – Logo Contest Entries are due
  • July 18-July31 – Committee reviews and selects 2017 LOGO
  • July 25-September 2 – Logo winner works with staff and designer to produce 3 versions of the logo (icon, medium and full size), 3 colors versions (two color, full color, and gray scale) and different formats (.EPS, .JPG, and .PNG)
  • Mid-September –  Logo and theme revealed

 

Kate Hennessy

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July 19, 2016

Ethnographic Terminalia 2016, Minneapolis: Workshop ––”The Photo-Essay is Dead! Long live the Photo-Essay!”

July 19, 2016 | By | No Comments

Meetings of the American Anthropology Association, 2016
Minneapolis MN
Thursday, November 17, 2016 9:00-4:00

See our Call for Photo-Essayist Presentations here (deadline August 15th)
General participant registration on the AAA Website will be available soon.
Please send inquiries to ethnographicterminalia@gmail.com

Overview
The Ethnographic Terminalia Collective invites submissions by photo-essayists working within an anthropological idiom to present their photo-essays at a full-day workshop at the 2016 AAA Meetings in Minneapolis: “The Photo-Essay is Dead! Long Live the Photo-Essay!” The full-day workshop is designed for creative and engaged participation from both participants and presenters.  It is structured around three sessions each of which features the presentation of a photo-essay, a thought-provoking discussion of photography in Anthropology, and facilitator-led group activity. In the course of the day up to thirty workshop participants and six presenters will collectively contribute to a zine (an open-access and limited print-edition workshop publication) that will be launched and distributed at a reception on Saturday, Nov. 19th. The zine will function not only as a document of the workshop but also a formal object around which we explore the past, present, and future of the photo-essay in Anthropology.

Building on our art-anthropology experiments in off-site locations, this year we return  to the AAA conference site to re-examine the photo-essay within anthropological, photographic, and publishing communities.  Emulating our recent workshop and rapid-publication project (see http://ethnographicterminalia.org/terminus), the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective invites you to join us in actively considering how experimentations at the intersection of art and anthropology might function as prototypes for thinking about the future of the photographic image in anthropology.  We are all literally publishing at the terminus — the end of publishing agreements, the end of print, the end of things as they have been. How might the photo-essay work as a prototype for collectively envisioning a future of visual anthropology?

Rationale
Photographs have been a component of anthropological practice since its earliest formation. Their popularity over the past 150 years in monographs, journals, exhibitions, and now on the Internet, has increased dramatically. While photographs seem to be everywhere there has been little serious and sustained critical engagement with modes of presentation and publication in the context of visual anthropology.  For over a decade, the internet has increasingly become a rapid and inexpensive way to share photographs but there is little discussion about the forms in which they appear and how people engage with them. Due partly to cost, the photo-essay has never become prevalent within academic publications. Furthermore there is little clarity around the definition of a photo-essay especially in the context of anthropology. This is precisely what interests us. Our academic conventions for sharing photographs have been cemented around a limited number of typically black and white images in a journal article or monograph. It is only within the last decade that we’ve begun to see anthropological photo-essays published on-line and these often seem to be either ghettoized within the structure of the journal’s website or overlooked by readers unfamiliar with the genre.  Meanwhile within journalism and documentary photography there has been a surge of experiments and formal endeavours.

We believe that still photographs are on the cusp of finding new importance in anthropology in the form of the photo-essay, in particular as the serial nature of photography is being tested out within digital infrastructures on the Internet. For example, the journal Cultural Anthropology recently launched a photo-essay section of their journal; other major journals, now investing in digital infrastructures, are leveraging the Internet to share photographs. How digital forms and cross-disciplinary engagements with photographic representations are re-shaping aesthetic and ethical commitments to the photo essay remains unclear. However, we do know that more and more anthropologists use cameras in the field and many students are keen to study visual methodologies. As a result, the criteria for evaluating their critical and aesthetic contributions have yet to be fully developed. Further, the creative potential for the photo-essay to be realized in new formats and contexts is as yet generally unexplored. Ethnographic Terminalia has had a sustained engagement with contemporary art since 2009; in the workshop, we will  bring artists and anthropologists together to appreciate the degree of sophistication and variety of experiments in what might be loosely considered the photo-essay.

Workshop Structure
Ethnographic Terminalia is committed to serious play; our workshops are carefully designed to foster lively and generative spaces for critical collective exploration of a topic, thesis, or question.  Facilitated by the Ethnographic Terminalia Collective, up to thirty participants and six presenters will work collectively throughout the day to generate the materials for a zine in the form of a rapid prototype publication.  This workshop is organized into three sessions, each with: 1) an essayist exploring their work in the form of a single photo-essay; 2) a provocateur who will critically explore some element of the photo-essay; and 3) facilitated activities and open time for participant reflection on and annotation of works in progress, discussion, and contribution to the workshop publication.

Before the workshop, photo-essayists  and provocateurs will be asked to submit creatively designed page spreads featuring photo-essays and discussions. These will be included in the zine and printed for annotation during the workshop. Participants are also encouraged to print photographs from their own photo-essay works-in-progress and bring them to work with throughout the day.

During the workshop, presenters’ photo-essays will be installed for viewing and annotation. Participants and provocateurs will be invited to add commentary and other ephemera (using photography, photo printers, drawing, social media posts, annotation, and so on) to further contribute to the conversation. These contributions will be documented for inclusion in the publication. Additionally, workshop participants (who are not official presenters) are invited to bring their own photo essays-in-progress to contribute to the workshop activity, and which may be included in the publication.

After the workshop the Ethnographic Terminalia collective will complete the design and layout of the zine.  We will print copies for distribution on Saturday afternoon (Nov. 19th) at the AAA Meetings at a special event and zine launch supported by the Society for Visual Anthropology.  All participants will receive a copy of the zine, as will a limited number of reception attendees. An open access digital copy of the zine will be archived on the Ethnographic Terminalia website. You can see an example of the publication “Terminus: Archives, Ephemera, and Electronic Art” that we produced at our last workshop in Vancouver, British Columbia in 2015. http://ethnographicterminalia.org/terminus.

Kate Hennessy

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July 5, 2016

CFP: Documenting the Visual Arts (edited collection; deadline: Nov 1, 2016)

July 5, 2016 | By | No Comments

The proliferation and popularity of visual arts documentaries are a major component of the recent international documentary boom, but they tend to be overlooked in film criticism and scholarship in favor of documentaries framed more explicitly in social and political terms. Yet visual arts documentaries remain on the cutting edge of documentary innovation, from 3D cinema (Cave of Forgotten Dreams) to questioning documentary truths (Exit Through the Gift Shop). Moreover, visual arts documentaries have long played significant roles in various historical formations around documentary politics (e.g. USIA films in the Cold War, the Left Bank essay films of 1950s and Channel Four programming in the 1980s).

This edited collection will examine the significance of visual arts documentaries from a range of critical perspectives and methodologies. The book will explore not only how documentaries from around the globe exploit the formal properties of film and video to illuminate the aesthetic specificities and intersections of other visual arts, but also how they elucidate the material and cultural conditions in which visual arts are produced and experienced (e.g. the discourse of the artist, museums and galleries, activist art, religious practice, commercial design etc.). To complement these interpretative contributions, the book will also include critical analyses of the political economy of visual arts documentaries, especially the geopolitics of the genre. As an interdisciplinary and intermedial project, I am particularly interested in contributions that connect film studies to other disciplines and fields, including anthropology, art history, architecture, communication, rhetoric, performance studies and visual studies, among others. Consideration will be given to submissions about any historical period or cultural/national/regional context (the book aims for genuinely global scope). Contributions may focus on a single film, a body of work (organized around filmmaker, artist or subject) or a particular institutional context. I am defining visual arts broadly to include applied arts, such as fashion, architecture and design, as well as film, video, photography, painting, sculpture, illustration and performance art etc.

Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
• Medium specificity and the visual arts documentary
• Cultural politics of visual arts television programming
• Documentary film and arts education
• Visual arts documentary as cultural diplomacy
• Post/colonial appropriation and resistance in visual arts documentaries
• Representing visual aesthetic practices in ethnographic film
• Documenting performance and collaboration in the visual arts
• Documenting activist art practices
• Discourses of the visual artist in documentary film
• Documentaries about art institutions and markets
• Visual arts documentary as paratext (making of documentaries, exhibition documentaries)
• Relationship between documentary filmmaking and archival documentation of visual arts
• Histories of arts television networks and series
• Film technologies and the visual arts documentary
• Fakery, forgery and mockumentary

Deadline for electronic submission of 350-400 word abstract (plus brief biographical statement and sample 5- item bibliography): November 1, 2016. Notification by December 1, 2016.
Commissioned chapters should not exceed 5,000 words and must be completed by October 1, 2017.
Please send submissions and inquiries via email to Roger Hallas, Associate Professor of English (Film & Screen Studies), Syracuse University, USA: rhallas@syr.edu

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