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Kate Hennessy - 3/19 - Society for Visual Anthropology

Kate Hennessy

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November 17, 2015

2015 SVA AAA Program now available

November 17, 2015 | By | No Comments

The 2015 SVA Program Committee (Susan Falls and Fiona P. McDonald) are happy to announce the 2015 SVA Program. You won’t want to miss any of this year’s amazing Film and Media Festival, SVA workshops, roundtables, sessions, Installations, and parties! Download the 2015 SVA AAA Meeting Program here so that you can be sure to connect to all of the people and media you want to see.

Kate Hennessy

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October 26, 2015

Ethnographic Terminalia Presents ‘Aeolian Politics’, Denver 2015

October 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Denver, CO. November 17-22, 2015
Emmanuel Gallery

In the midst of this boom of writing and thinking and worrying about the end of the world brought on by anthropogenic climate catastrophes, Ethnographic Terminalia presents Aeolian Politics.  It is indeed the end of time for glaciers that have withstood thousands of years, cycling through periods of freeze and thaw.  It is the end of time for entire species extinguished at such an alarming rate that even the most hardened observer of the ‘news’ must be a little shaken and perturbed.

It is in this moment that we have enthusiastically collaborated with Cymene Howe and Dominic Boyer to translate their work, Aeolian Politics, into an exhibition. We all inhabit the weather world, regardless of the little shelters built to insulate us from the elements. The banal familiarity of the seasons as they wash over us no longer require studied effort to estrange them.  Strange weather is here.  The force of this world—which we re-engineered through centuries of mining, fossil-fuel burning, over-fishing, agro-industrial growth, and so on—imposes itself upon our everyday so that we must make a constant effort to make the strange familiar and pretend that everything will be okay. At times the veneer of a stable and predictable life seems terribly thin.

We welcome you to explore the Windhouse, a gallery within a gallery, caught up in an airy torrent of wind politics where the materiality of Zapotec words invoke the weird familiarity of wind in the weather world.

Emmanuel Gallery
November 17-22, 2015
1205 10th Street, Denver, CO 80204
http://www.emmanuelgallery.org/

Opening Reception Friday 20 November 7pm – 11:30 pm

For more information please visit our website and Press Release

etap2015-card-v3

Kate Hennessy

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October 26, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Jonathan Westin on Uncertainty in Historical Visualizations

October 26, 2015 | By | No Comments

Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

Jonathan Westin’s “Inking a Past: Visualization as a Shedding of Uncertainty” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014) uses Actor-Network Theory to understand how a visualization studio renders representations of the past.
Questions for classroom discussion:

1. When thinking of the past, for instance Medieval Times or Antiquity, what images form in your mind and how do you differ between the different time periods? Are there certain elements you “include” in your mental image that gives you cues?

2. How does the visualization work of SIF (Studio InkLink Firenze) compare to previous efforts to visualize ancient Rome and other past societies? What are the dominant trends in archeological visualization today?

3. The article describes how an illustration is created through a series of steps that bring shape and form to an initial idea. Is any one step more important than another, and who is the most influential actant in this chain of procedures?

4. The article concludes that it is better to speculate than to only reconstruct what is certain. What dangers lies in both of these approaches respectively, and what are the advantages?

5. How do you think the insights and concepts of Actor-Network Theory can benefit visual anthropologists in their work?

6. One of the most controversial elements of an ANT perspective is the endowing of objects and other nun-human elements with agency, that is, interpreting them as actants within a larger actor-network. What does such a move do to anthropological theory? How does it complicate or clarify the interpretative work of anthropologists?

7. Is it time for an ANT analysis of the field of anthropology itself? Have we escaped the interrogative lens of STS work for too long?

Links:

 

Kate Hennessy

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October 15, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Noelle Stout on Promiscuous Circulation

October 15, 2015 | By | No Comments

Noelle Stout’s video interview about her article, “Bootlegged: Unauthorized Circulation and the Dilemmas of Collaboration in the Digital Age” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014), shows how digital technology both expands the possibilities for collaborative ethnographic filmmaking and challenges these relationships, since videos can be easily copied and circulated beyond the established consent agreements.

 

Kate Hennessy

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October 3, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Ethan Sharp on Narcocultura at the Mexican Military Museum

October 3, 2015 | By | No Comments

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

Ethan Sharp’s “Visualizing Narcocultura: Violent Media, the Mexican Military’s Museum of Drugs, and Transformative Culture” (VAR 30-2, Fall 2014) explores the museumification of drug culture in Mexico as a pedagogical dimension of the drug war.

Sharp1

The following set of questions and resources provide pedagogical tools to be used in undergraduate courses.

Questions for classroom discussion:

  1. What are some insights that you would expect to gain into drug trafficking and the drug war from a visit to the Mexican military’s museum of drugs? What are some insights that the museum might provide that are not available at other sites or in other forms of media?
  2. Why does the Mexican military have a museum of drugs? Why is the museum closed to the general public? Why has the Mexican military allowed journalists and other media professionals to disseminate reports about and photos of the museum in recent years?
  3. How are representations of narocultura in the museum similar to and different from representations of narcocultura in other media, such as television shows, narcocorridos, and films?
  4. What are some of the different ways in which you can interpret the representations of narocultura in the museum? For example, how does the museum promote or celebrate narcocultura? How does it denigrate narcocultura? How does it undermine or move beyond the concept of narcocultura?
  5. How do museums contribute to processes of self-discipline and self-reform? Do you agree that the Mexican military’s museum of drugs contributes to self-discipline and self-reform? Why or why not?
  6. Is it possible to develop a critique of the military and its strategies through the museum? If so, how?
  7. Can you imagine some better uses of the museum, or some ways in which the museum could be re-developed? Do you think that the museum should be opened to the general public? Why or why not?

Sharp2

Additional resources:
Links to representations of the museum in the media that are referenced in footnotes:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/13/AR2010011304573.html

Links to other representations of the museum in the media:

http://www.pri.org/stories/2010-01-26/mexico-citys-drug-museum

Links to blogs that provide information about the drug war in Mexico. These blogs occasionally provide links to videos posted by drug trafficking organizations, as well as videos and other resources posted by citizen journalists.

http://www.blogdelnarco.com/

http://www.borderlandbeat.com/

Other forms of media that are mentioned in the article are narcorridos and telenovelas that feature drug traffickers. The following are links to youtube videos that are trailers for telenovelas and/or videos produced by well-known performers of narcocorridos. I have provided short explanations for each one.

A video by Los Tigres del Norte featuring the corrido of La Reina del Sur. La Reina del Sur was a novel about a woman who became a drug trafficker. The novel was made into a television serial in Mexico: 

A trailer for the television serial “Camelia la Tejana,” which is based on a corrido originally performed by Los Tigres del Norte (the song that is performed in the trailer is the corrido of Camelia la Tejana): 

Video created for the corrido “El Ejecutor” by El Komander: 

A documentary film entitled “Narcocultura,” recently released on DVD provides a very good introduction to the drug war in Mexico and the different forms of media associated with narcocultura. The following is a link to the trailer for the film. 

Sharp4

Kate Hennessy

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September 11, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Deborah Matzner on South Asian Soundscapes

September 11, 2015 | By | No Comments

Deborah Matzner’s article on “Jai Bhim Comrade and the Politics of Sound in Urban Indian Visual Culture” in Visual Anthropology Review examines the sonic practices of the Dalit movement in Maharashtra as depicted by Indian documentary filmmaker Anand Patwardhan.

Figure 5 Megaphone on Taxi

Kate Hennessy

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August 31, 2015

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: William Lempert on Native Science Fiction Film

August 31, 2015 | By | No Comments

VAR SUPPLEMENTS: Classroom Activities and Discussion Questions

The following set of activities is meant to be a teacher-led pedagogical tool for provoking undergraduates to engage their perceptions of indigenous futures. It is hoped that this will help to disrupt the ways in which Native peoples have become representationally embedded within Western media and imaginations as artifacts of the past.

  1. Close your eyes for 60 seconds and in as vivid detail as possible, imagine that extraterrestrials land on Earth today. Write down a few key images.
    • Where do they land and who do they meet?
    • Is there conflict? If so, describe it.
  1. This time, close your eyes for 60 seconds and vividly imagine what the future, broadly defined, will look like in 200 years. Write down a few key images.
    • What utopian and dystopian elements did this include?
    • What role, if any, was there for indigenous people?
  1. List a few of your favorite science fiction films.
    • In what ways do the plots of these films correlate with what you imagined in the first two activities?
    • How influential do you think these films have been on your own ideas about the future?
  1. Watch as many of the clips below as you have time for (totals approximately 35 minutes).
    • What was your reaction to these clips in light of this article?
    • Did you agree with the author’s interpretations? Why or why not?
  1. In light of the article and these viewings, choose one of your listed favorite sci-fi films from activity 3 and briefly describe how it might be reimagined to highlight indigenous perspectives.
  1. To what extent does the article convince you that the representations of indigenous peoples in science fiction films have the potential to make practical differences in the lives of indigenous peoples?

Film Links

Available Film Links

 Lisa Jackson’s The Visit (4 mins)

Vistas – The Visit by Lisa Jackson, National Film Board of Canada

Jeff Barnaby’s File under Miscellaneous (7 mins)

Nanobah Becker’s The 6th World (15 mins)

FOR MORE NATIVE SCI-FI FILM CLIPS, CLICK HERE TO LEMPERT’S ONLINE ARCHIVE OF 18 STREAMING CLIPS

CLICK HERE TO LINK TO A GENERAL AUDIENCE BLOG POST THAT SUMMARIZES THE VAR ARTICLE

Related Readings

Dillon, Grace. 2012. Walking the Clouds: An Anthology of Indigenous Science Fiction. Tucson: University of Arizona Press.

Nama, Adilifu. 2008. Black Space: Imagining Race in Science Fiction Film. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Rieder, John. 2008. Colonialism and the Emergence of Science Fiction. Middletown: Wesleyan University Press.

Collins, Samuel. 2008. All Tomorrow’s Cultures: Anthropological Engagements with the Future. New York: Berghahn Books.

Supplemental Resources

 Imagining Indigenous Futurisms – Facebook Page

This facebook page is an excellent resource to critical scholarship and commentary on indigenous futurisms, with regular engagement with Native science fiction films.

IndigiTube

IndigiTube is an Aboriginal Australian example of an video-sharing website that aligns with indigenous futurism in that it is a new media delivery system that appeals to indigenous youth whose primary media engagements are through phones and tablets, as well as its wide variety of topics that transcend binary tropes around tradition and “contemporary modern” life.

Bunky Echo-Hawk’s Website

 

Kate Hennessy

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August 13, 2015

Call for Society for Visual Anthropology Film and Media Festival Co-Directors

August 13, 2015 | By | No Comments

The Society for Visual Anthropology (SVA) invites applications for Co- Directors for the annual SVA Film and Media Festival (SVAF&MF). This is a 3- year position that will begin after the end of the 2015 meetings (December 2015) and continues until the end of the 2018 Meetings (with the option of serving a reduced 2-year term through 2017). Ideally, the terms will be coordinated so that there will be some overlap between terms by current and new co-editors.

About SVAF&MF:

The Society for Visual Anthropology’s Film & Media Festival is the premier venue for screening ethnographic film and media showcasing works by students, professional anthropologists, and documentary filmmakers from around the world. Each year the festival is held during the

American Anthropological Association’s (AAA) annual conference.

SVAF&MF is a three and half day event that begins on Wednesday afternoon and concludes on Saturday evening of the AAA meetings. SVAF&MF co- directors work with the SVA board and jury, comprised of anthropologists and filmmakers to make programing decisions and select films to be included in the festival each year on the basis of ethnographic relevance, production quality and contribution to the field of anthropology.

Qualifications of SVAF&MF co-directors include:

  1. A proven background in fields related to Visual Anthropology and Ethnographic Film.
  2. Proven organizational skills, especially in managing events and coordinating presentations and Q&A sessions (i.e. workshops, conferences, and/or visual exhibitions).
  3. Familiarity with the technologies associated with online screening and assessment as well as film festival exhibition (Vimeo, Youtube, Dropbox, Google Doc, Handbreak, WithoutaBox and Film Freeway, (MOV.) QuickTime, iTunes).
  4. Familiarity with the canon of Ethnographic Film in the American tradition.

Responsibilities include:

  1. Contract with the film festival hosting site (WithoutABox or Film Freeway) to renew and update the festival account and submission listing (Jan).
  2. Work with the S V A board members to solicit submissions through annual calls for entries (Deadlines include – Early: Feb 15; Regular: March 15; Late: April 15).
  3. Organize pre-screening of films. Digitize DVDs and digital media that are submitted into an online format (currently Vimeo) suitable for prescreening and jurying. Create ranking database.
  4. Appoint the SVAF&MF Jury in consultation with the SVA board.
  5. Manage S V AF&MF Gmail mailbox
  6. Send pre-screening notes and assignments to SVAF&MF Jury.
  7. Coordinate the hosting of the jury meetings and works with SVAPresident and the SVAF&MF jury to coordinate the 3-day jurying of films (June).
  8. Determine prizewinners with jury; notify winner and assist withcoordination of travel plans with filmmakers attending the festival and award presentations with SVA Board.
  9. ScheduletheSVAFilm&MediaFestivalinconsultationwithSVAprogramming Committee for room availability/requirements andtechnology needs.

10.Create program (collate synopsis, press materials and film stills into one master document). Advertise for the film festival via email and social media. Work with SVA website manager to upload the program and trailers on the SVA website.

11.Manage the collection of final exhibition prints – digitize all prints into MOV. QuickTime Film. Procure a laptop and hard drives to store and screen film during the festival and organize the digital films according to the program.

12.Organize staffing (projectionist and program manager) for all three days of the film festival itself at the Annual Meetings of the AAA. Coordinate facilitators for the Q&A session with filmmakers in attendance.

13.Manage budget in consultation with SVA Treasurer, including costs for jurying, technical support, staff, travel awards, and advertising.

The SVAF&MF Co-Directors should commit to the following work effort:

  1. Two to three hours a week from January to early March for festival planning/preparation.
  2. Three to four hours a week from mid-March to April for festival related communications, database preparation.
  3. Five to six hours a week in April and May for pre-screening communications, data input, etc.
  4. Three weeks in June for jurying preparation and jurying hosting.
  5. Four to five hours a week from July to September for conference andfilm festival coordination and planning, communicating with filmmakers and AAA programming committee, and to prepare an annual report for the SVA Board.
  6. At least twelve hours a week in October and early November for festival coordination and planning.
  7. At least several days immediately before, during and after the AAA annual meeting for festival management. (Past co-directors found that at least half of every day at the annual meeting was used in festival related activities). Co-directors should expect to arrive at the AAA meetings one day early (Tuesday) and stay until Sunday; they are also expected to attend the SVA Board Meeting as well as the SVA Business Meeting and Awards Ceremony.

Compensation

SVA Film and Media Festival Director is a voluntary position and does not receive direct compensation for time or effort. The SVA Board will reimburse expenses directly related to film festival upon approval. Jurying travel and meal expenses are covered by the SVA. Film Festival co-directors’ attendance at the AAA annual meeting is required and reimbursed (up to $1500 total to be shared between the two co-directors).

For further information or to submit application by September 30th 2015 (please include letter of interest, detailing qualifications and current CV) email SVA President-Elect Stephanie Takaragawa : Stephanie.takaragawa@gmail.com

Kate Hennessy

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June 15, 2015

Ethnographic Terminalia awarded the 2015 Michael M. Ames Award for Innovative Museum Anthropology

June 15, 2015 | By | No Comments

Exciting news from the Council for Museum Anthropology!

ANNOUNCING THE 2015 MICHAEL M. AMES AWARD!!

We are pleased to announce that the Council for Museum Anthropology has awarded the 2015 Michael M. Ames Award for Innovative Museum Anthropology to Ethnographic Terminalia for their collective curatorial work since 2009 and the creative experimental approach that they have brought to their installations. Their work encourages intellectual and methodological exchanges between museum anthropology, visual anthropology, digital humanities, curatorial studies and contemporary art and holds tremendous potential as Ethnographic Terminalia continues to grow, produce exhibitions and publications, and partner with diverse venues.

Please join us at the CMA reception in Denver at the AAA meetings in November when we will present the award.

cma-seal

Kate Hennessy

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June 15, 2015

Visual Anthropology Review 31(1) Spring 2015: “Leviathan and the Entangled Lives of Species”

June 15, 2015 | By | No Comments

“Leviathan and the Entangled Lives of Species,” a special issue of Visual Anthropology Review, is out now. Read critiques and commentary by prominent anthropologists and visual scholars—including Christopher Pinney, Catherine Russell, and Eduardo Kohn—about Leviathan, the exciting and challenging piece of ethnographic cinema that is pushing visual representation into new terrain. Also, check out photo essays and experimental audio-visual materials by anthropologists like Amanda Concha-Holmes and Rodrigo F. Rentería-Valencia, that explore the utility of visual ethnography for investigating the entanglement of human lives with birds, fish, monkeys, and other species. This special issue interrogates the role of visual anthropology in re-thinking our understandings of human/non-human relations. It is available on AnthroSource and through Wiley-Blackwell.

 

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